Trogon Dipping

Virginia Rail
Virginia Rail, Tyrrell Park Cattail Marsh, Jefferson County, January 28th 2018. One of four showing well in the open, unusual for this normally shy and retiring species.

In the full month since my last update, birding has been steady but not spectacular. I would even have said things were fairly good, were it not for a rather painful “dip” of a mega that showed up pretty much in my backyard in New Braunfels (well, a ten-minute drive away, which is practically backyard by Texas standards).

Late on a Saturday night, a week-old report (complete with photos) of a female Elegant Trogon appeared on the Facebook group “What’s That Bird?”. The Trogon was said to have been photographed in Panther Canyon, which is a scenic, three-quarter-mile long trail adjoining Landa Park close to downtown New Braunfels. I happened to be already in town when the news broke, so naturally I went straight to Panther Canyon at first light the next day. The chances of relocating the bird appeared to be vanishingly small, at best – the report was already a week old, and the bird could easily have moved on. Also, trogons of all species are notoriously hard to find. They spend long periods of time perched motionless, and are usually easiest to locate when vocalizing, which a winter female would most likely not be doing.

It’s kind of an odd feeling to be chasing a bird that you’re pretty sure you’re not going to find. After a couple of hours in the canyon, along with about ten other birders, I called it a day and went up to Canyon Lake instead, where the birding was much more rewarding with both Canyon Wren and Rock Wren within 30 feet of each other along the dam, plus several other goodies including a Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay in trees near the dam, and a group of Eared Grebes on the water.

Canyon Wren
Canyon Wren on the dam at Canyon Lake, Comal County, February 4th 2018.

It was quite a surprise when news came through late in the day of the Elegant Trogon having been seen in Panther Canyon shortly before dark, and Carlos Ross managed to take some photos which confirmed the presence of this bird beyond all doubt. I happened to have already taken Monday morning off work, so there I was again in the canyon at first light the next day. I could only spare a couple of hours before I had to head back to Houston, however once again the Elegant Trogon didn’t show. Birding in Panther Canyon was proving to be an endurance test because – while the habitat bears a passing resemblance to exciting Elegant Trogon habitat in southeast Arizona – there seem to be very few birds living in there. Chases are always much more enjoyable when there are other birds around to maintain a birder’s focus and interest.

As I stalked slowly up and down the canyon, staring at Trogon-less trees, I was reminded of a chase (in the UK we call it a “twitch”) to see a Buff-bellied Pipit in Lincolnshire on a bitterly cold and overcast day in the depths of winter in about 2003. It was a near four-hour drive to the site, an enormous bare earth field just inland from the coast. A hundred birders lined up along the edge of the field for an eight-hour vigil, in the teeth of an easterly gale, scanning for the pipit. During that time I saw perhaps half a dozen species, and not a whiff of my target bird. The long drive home in the gloom of a winter afternoon was almost a relief after such a miserable day.

Anyway, the Elegant Trogon was refound in Panther Canyon at around 3.00pm, meaning that several of the birders who had been there in the morning had been looking for almost eight hours before locating the bird. Their patience and dedication is highly commendable. The Trogon was seen again on Tuesday (for prolonged periods, naturally while I was at work in Houston) and Thursday, but not on Wednesday and Friday despite plenty of people out there looking. It was always being found in the afternoons, sometimes right before dusk, so on Saturday I spent the last three hours of daylight in the canyon (along with perhaps fifty birders) with no luck. It has not been seen since, but it is possibly still present – there is a high chance the bird is wintering in the area, and either moves elsewhere for prolonged periods, or (most likely) is so unobtrusive that it basically never gets found along the canyon unless it is close enough for birders to almost trip over it. It surely is no coincidence that every time the bird has been found, it has initially been located within a few feet of the trail or even in trees directly above it.

Landa Park did have a consolation prize to offer on Saturday, a female Rusty Blackbird at the lake, an excellent county bird in what seems to have been a good winter for stray individuals of this species in central Texas. I could at least claim THAT for my Comal county list, which at 142 species as I write, is steadily moving in the right direction!

Wood Duck
Wood Duck at Landa Park, New Braunfels, February 4th 2018.
My focus this year is on county birding, instead of pan-Texas year listing, and I’ve had several excellent “county days” in the last month. I headed to Brazoria county on January 20th with James Rieman, and we quickly located the long-staying Glaucous Gull on the beach at Quintana, only to watch it fly to the end of the jetty and join an unprecedented second individual on the sea. A prolonged visit to the San Bernard refuge for the rest of the day produced 81 species including an unseasonal Yellow-breasted Chat and nice looks at American Bittern and Ash-throated Flycatcher.
Glaucous Gull
Glaucous Gull, Quintana Beach, Brazoria County, January 20th 2018.
Quintana Beach
Quintana Beach early in the morning on January 20th 2018.
Jefferson county the following weekend produced 103 species in one day, with my personal highlight being cracking views of several Virginia Rails feeding out in the open at Cattail Marsh near Beaumont. This handsome and retiring denizen of dense marshland vegetation can be a tough bird to see (I didn’t find one at all during my “big year” in 2017), but at this site they appeared to be very bold and unafraid to venture out of cover.
Blue-headed Vireo
Blue-headed Vireo. I took this photo at Bear Creek Park in Houston, but this species is a fairly common winterer at a number of sites I visit regularly.
I’ve been visiting Edith L Moore reserve in Houston from time to time during my lunch breaks and after work (my office is less than a minute’s drive away), a location which offers plenty of birds in winter near the cabin, but usually belonging to the same range of resident and wintering species with few surprises. However, regular birds here in winter include Wilson’s Warbler, Blue-headed Vireo and Hermit Thrush, while the spectacular Pileated Woodpecker is resident, so it’s always a good location to spend half an hour on a sunny day. I usually take a camera with me, but the one time I didn’t (on a gloomy late afternoon that threatened rain), I had a close and prolonged encounter with a beautiful Barred Owl. It’s been a good year so far for owls, with 5 species already on my year list – Barred, Barn, Burrowing, Short-eared, and no fewer than eight encounters so far with the magnificent Great Horned Owl. Just the relatively common, but often hard to find, Eastern Screech-Owl to go to complete the set of regular east/central Texas owls for the year.
Grasshopper Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow at Attwater Prairie Chicken NWR on January 21st 2018.
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Golden-crowned Kinglet at Bear Creek Park. This tiny bird is extremely active, and this is the only time I’ve managed to capture a passable photo of one despite numerous efforts!



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