LRGV and coastal Texas, March 11th-13th

Black and White Warbler
Black and White Warbler, Holt Paradise Pond (Port Aransas), March 13th 2017.

It’s mid-March and we are right on the cusp of Texas’s most exciting time for birds – spring migration – so this weekend I decided I had better get down to the Lower Rio Grande Valley to grab some nice tropical year ticks (and perhaps a lifer or two) before I get too distracted by migration here on my doorstep in Houston.

It’s a long way to “the Valley”, about a 5.5 hour drive each way, and to avoid putting lots of miles on the elderly Jaguar I am currently borrowing, I instead opted to rent an economy car. With more than 900 miles driven over the three days, the money I saved in gas compared to running the Jaguar almost equaled the cost of renting a compact Hyundai. And as every birder knows, the great thing with a rental car is that you can rack up thousands of miles driving it non-stop for days, fill it with mud, take it down potholed unmade roads and onto beaches, then hand it back and let Enterprise take care of the wear and tear. It wouldn’t surprise me if before long some rental companies wised up and inserted a “no birding” clause in their rental agreement.

Louisiana Waterthrush2
Louisiana Waterthrush, Falfurrias Rest Area, March 11th 2017.

An essential stop on every birding itinerary to south Texas is the Falfurrias Rest Area, a busy toilet block  and picnic area sandwiched in between the north- and southbound carriageways of highway 281. Despite the unpromising-sounding description, the numerous mature trees here are alluring for migrants, and there is even a short nature trail through some very birdy-looking woods draped in Spanish moss. For some reason – perhaps because a lot of birders stop here – this place has a reputation for turning up lots of rarities.

My 30-minute stop here yielded a ton of great birds, including a lifer Yellow-throated Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Blue-headed Vireo, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, and the first signs of the tropical south: several noisy and colorful Green Jays.

Yellow-throated Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler, Falfurrias Rest Area, March 11th 2017.

Once down in the LRGV, the cloudy morning gave way to a sunny and sweltering hot afternoon with high humidity and barely a breath of wind. I spent the whole afternoon at Estero Llano Grande State Park, mopping up year ticks at their usual stakeouts, including this Eastern (McCall’s) Screech Owl ……

Eastern Screech-Owl
Eastern (McCall’s) Screech Owl, Estero Llano Grande SP, March 11th 2017.

….. and this Common Pauraque, which most likely holds the honor of being Texas’s most photographed bird:

Common Pauraque
Common Pauraque, Estero Llano Grande SP, March 11th 2017.

However, I unfortunately managed to miss the long-staying male Rose-throated Becard by less than half a minute. It also proved harder to connect with hummingbirds here than it did last winter, but I did eventually find both Buff-bellied Hummingbird and this Black-chinned Hummingbird in the Tropical Zone:

Black-chinned Hummingbird2
Black-chinned Hummingbird, Estero Llano Grande SP, March 11th 2017.

By dawn on Sunday morning the weather had changed dramatically, as is common in these parts, with temperatures dropping from the mid-80s to the mid-60s and a chilly wind blowing. I turned up at Santa Ana NWR and was immediately cheered by the news that no fewer than 8 Northern Beardless-Tyrannulets had been seen in various locations in the park yesterday, and I was directed to an area where a pair was in the process of nest-building close to the trail. Not only could I hear a male Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet singing there when I arrived, but another one was answering it not too far away. Only a matter of time before I saw one, right? Wrong. The birds stayed well hidden in the breezy conditions, and before long stopped singing entirely, making them impossible to locate.

Compensation of sorts came in the form of several wonderful Altamira Orioles, an LRGV specialty which is found nowhere else in the US:

Altamira Oriole
Altamira Oriole, Santa Ana NWR, March 12th 2017.

…. and Olive Sparrows, which are abundant at this site, and once I became familiar with their call I began finding them everywhere, but they stubbornly refused to be photographed.

It was difficult to decide what to do with the afternoon. I opted for the Yturria Tract, an arid area of thorn scrub, which at lunchtime on a cool and breezy day was a gamble, but I got lucky and saw some good birds including my main target Black-throated Sparrow (seemingly common here), White-tailed Hawk, Harris’s Hawk, Greater Roadrunner, Pyrrhuloxia and Verdin.

Harris Hawk
Harris’s Hawk, Santa Ana NWR, March 12th 2017.

I rounded out the afternoon at Anzalduas Park, where I had no specific targets in mind and hoped to enjoy some “general birding”. My wish came true, as the park was bursting at the seams with common birds, including one amazing flock which contained perhaps 35 individual birds of 14 different species.

It was good to compare Couch’s and Tropical Kingbirds, both on voice and plumage:

Couchs Kingbird
Couch’s Kingbird. This individual was photographed at Santa Ana NWR but I saw them at most sites in the LGRV. Note the thick-based and relatively short bill, and overall green tone to the mantle.
Tropical Kingbird
Tropical Kingbird, Anzalduas Park, March 12th 2017. Much scarcer than Couch’s Kingbird in the LRGV. Note the relatively long and thin-based bill, and grayer tone to the mantle compared to Couch’s Kingbird. The plumage differences are subtle, and voice is definitely the best way to distinguish the two species.

Border police booted me out of the park at 5.00pm sharp – Anzalduas Park is on the banks of the Rio Grande which forms the border with Mexico, and there is a huge police and border security presence in the area. I decided to start the long drive north in order to be ready for a dawn start on the coast in the Mustang Island/Port Aransas area.

Wilsons Plover2
Wilson’s Plover, Kennedy Causeway, Nueces County, March 13th 2017.

The day started with two fine Wilson’s Plovers, a shorebird I have seen only once before, in Honduras, then a flock of nine Pectoral Sandpipers – another USA tick, and another one struck off from the long list of Nearctic shorebirds I have seen as vagrants in the UK but not yet in their normal range in the Americas.

Two fantastic migrant hotspots on Mustang Island – “The Willows” and “Holt Paradise Pond” really raised the anticipation levels for the upcoming spring migration. Between the two sites, I saw two Louisiana Waterthrush, a total of 5 Black-and-White Warblers, Yellow-throated Warbler, White-eyed Vireo and Gray Catbird – a mere taster of the kind of range and quality that will be at these sites in  a month’s time, I suspect!

I had to leave around lunchtime to make sure I got back to Houston in time for the rental car return deadline,  but there was just enough time to grab Sandwich Tern for the year at the Port Aransas jetty, and this portrait of a Long-billed Dowitcher at the Port Aransas Nature Preserve:

Long-billed Dowitcher2
Long-billed Dowitcher, Port Aransas Nature Preserve, March 13th 2017.

With the clocks having gone forward this weekend, lighter evenings present opportunities for after-work birding. On Wednesday, a late afternoon visit to the Edith L Moore Nature Sanctuary, less than a mile from where I am currently living, turned up my 7th Black-and White Warbler of the last seven days (and 8th of the year overall), a fine male Wilson’s Warbler, and a long overdue Northern Flicker for the year list.

I’ll be in a warbler frame of mind in San Antonio this weekend, with Golden-cheeked Warbler top of the agenda – watch this space!

Total species count, LRGV and coastal Texas, March 11th-13th: 136

Lifers this weekend: Yellow-throated Warbler, Black-throated Sparrow (total 2,155).

USA ticks: Wild Turkey, Louisiana Waterthrush, Wilson’s Plover, Pectoral Sandpiper (total 317).

2017 Texas Year Ticks: Long-billed Thrasher, Curve-billed Thrasher, Clay-colored Thrush, Buff-bellied Hummingbird, Black-chinned Hummingbird, Common Pauraque, Eastern Screech Owl, White-tipped Dove, Yellow-crowned Night Heron, Plain Chachalaca, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Altamira Oriole, Olive Sparrow, Tropical Kingbird, Sandwich Tern, Wilson’s Warbler, Northern Flicker (total 232).

Plain Chachalaca
Plain Chachalacas, Estero Llano Grande SP, March 11th 2017. When these guys are at your bird table, nothing else gets a look-in!
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2 thoughts on “LRGV and coastal Texas, March 11th-13th

  1. As a native Texan, now transplanted to parts north, I relate! I miss this time of year for bird watching. My mom used to take us on hikes to identify bird feathers. We didn’t collect any that were from protected birds, of course, but I have fond memories of those walks through the woods of the Texas Hill Country.

    Like

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